Tuesday, July 29, 2014

For the faint hearted

“from the end of the earth I call to you when my heart is faint. Lead me to the rock that is higher than I, for you have been my refuge, a strong tower against the enemy.” (Psalm 61:2–3, ESV)

Lord, I am one of the weak and needy.

So much of life seems to demand our strength and composure. Life does not slow down for the weak, so we strive to be strong.

But what if we are not strong? What if our heart faints, the waters rise to our chin and the enemy pounds at the gates? What if there is no  more strength to hide the weakness?

Perhaps only now do I see myself truly. Perhaps only now do I see You truly.

Lord, I am not strong, so please be my strength.

Lord, I can't swim anymore, so rescue me from the waters.

Lord, the enemy is stronger than me, so fight for me.

With a faint heart, I cling to the Rock who is higher than I. I praise the one who was strong on my behalf. I worship the Refuge in whom I hide from the storm.



Tuesday, July 22, 2014

The joy of repentance

“I acknowledged my sin to you, and I did not cover my iniquity; I said, “I will confess my transgressions to the Lord,” and you forgave the iniquity of my sin. Selah” (Psalm 32:5, ESV)

Raise your hand if you love repentance! ...right, not too many hands I'm guessing. But you should love it.*

You should love it just like you love the doctor's and dentist's offices. Wait, you don't love those either? What's wrong with you?!**

Loving things like this has everything to do with the right perspective, doesn't it? The wrong (and common) perspective focuses on what we don't enjoy while forgetting what we gain.

The doctor's office isn't merely a series of sanitized waiting rooms with old magazines on hand. It's actually the place where debilitating medical conditions can be defeated.

The dentist's office isn't merely an interrogation room with a hypersonic water needle of terror. It's the place that ensures I can continue eating, which I must admit I am fond of.

Repentance begins with the unveiling of my scarred and abused soul, but repentance ends with that same soul made whole again.

The divine physician knows no disease so filthy that he cannot cleanse it. He knows no soul so broken that he cannot restore it.

Have you made the trip to see the divine physician lately? 


*Disclaimer: Author prefers other people repenting rather than repenting himself.
** Disclaimer 2: Author totally feels you.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Our beautiful God

  “One thing have I asked of the Lord, that will I seek after: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to gaze upon the beauty of the Lord and to inquire in his temple.” (Psalm 27:4, ESV)

How often do you think of God as beautiful?

We gravitate to certain aspects of him: his love, his might, his holiness, his grace and many others, no doubt.

But our God is also beautiful. His light makes a sunset appear like a flickering candle. His voice makes Mozart's arias fall flat in adoration. His Word leaves Shakespeare's sonnets speechless.

Our Lord could have been hideous and demanded our worship. Instead, he is beautiful and beckons us to join his family and take on the family resemblance.

One day that beauty will be ours to behold. One day we will lose ourselves in countless ages gazing on a beauty without compare.


For something beautiful today.

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

When joy is gone

“Restore to me the joy of your salvation, and uphold me with a willing spirit.” (Psalm 51:12, ESV)

On the good days, joy seems natural. Our hearts soar with the Scriptures, our calling seems so clear and certain.

Not every day is like that. Far from soaring, many days seem to limp along. On these days, certainty and conviction falter.

On these days, we ask, "Where has my joy gone?"

We pray the same longing prayer David did. Restore us to the place we know exists. Restore us to the joy we've experienced. Restore us to the faith that sustains our souls.

Seek the One who can answer such prayers. Seek him in faith by day and by night.

Weeping may last for the night, but joy comes with the morning

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Aimless faith

“Every athlete exercises self-control in all things. They do it to receive a perishable wreath, but we an imperishable. So I do not run aimlessly; I do not box as one beating the air.” (1 Corinthians 9:25–26, ESV)

Every season, for the joy of the sport, athletes strive not merely to be excellent, but to be the best. They train and yearn for the momentary glory of being crowned the season's champion. Then a new season comes and they do it all over again.

I stand convicted. For the joy of the Lord, I often live a lax and purposeless life. For the crown that never fades, I sporadically exert self-control.

Let today be different. Let the joy of the Lord stir me up to a life worthy of him. Let the unfading crown of glory be my highest goal.

May the athletes learn from the people of God what zeal looks like.